A Streetcar: Scenes 10-11

continued from A Streetcar: Scenes 7-9

SCENE TEN

It is a few hows later that night. Blanche has been drinking fairly steadily since Mitch left. She has dragged her wardrobe trunk into the center of the bedroom. It hangs open with flowery dresses thrown across it. As the drinking and packing went on, a mood of hysterical exhilaration came into her and she has decked herself out in a somewhat soiled and crumpled white satin evening gown and a pair of scuffed silver slippers with brilliants set in their heels. Now she is placing the rhinestone tiara on her head before the mirror of the dressing-table and murmuring
excitedly as if to a group of spectral admirers.

BLANCHE:
How about taking a swim, a moonlight swim at the old rock quarry? If anyone’s sober enough to drive a car! Ha-ha! Best way in the world to stop your head buzzing! Only you’ve got to be careful to dive where the deep pool is–if you hit a rock you don’t come up till tomorrow….
[Tremblingly she lifts the hand mirror for a closer inspection. She catches her breath and slams the mirror face down with such violence that the glass cracks. She moans a little and attempts to rise.
[Stanley appears around the corner of the building. He still has on the vivid green silk bowling shirt. As he rounds the corner the honky-tonk music is heard. It continues softly throughout the scene.
[He enters the kitchen, slamming the door. As he peers in at Blanche, he gives a low whistle. He has had a few drinks on the way and has brought some quart beer bottles home with him.]
BLANCHE:
How is my sister?
STANLEY:
She is doing okay.
BLANCHE:
And how is the baby?
STANLEY [grinning amiably]:
The baby won’t come before morning so they told me to go home and get a little shuteye.
BLANCHE:
Does that mean we are to be alone in here?
STANLEY:
Yep. Just me and you, Blanche. Unless you got somebody hid under the bed. What’ve you got on those fine feathers for?
BLANCHE:
Oh, that’s right. You left before my wire came.
STANLEY:
You got a wire?
BLANCHE:
I received a telegram from an old admirer of mine.
STANLEY:
Anything good?
BLANCHE:
I think so. An invitation.
STANLEY:
What to? A fireman’s ball?
BLANCHE [throwing back her head]:
A cruise of the Caribbean on a yacht!
STANLEY:
Well, well. What do you know?
BLANCHE:
I have never been so surprised in my life.
STANLEY:
I guess not.
BLANCHE:
It came like a bolt from the blue!
STANLEY:
Who did you say it was from?
BLANCHE:
An old beau of mine.
STANLEY:
The one that give you the white fox-pieces?
BLANCHE:
Mr. Shep Huntleigh. I wore his ATO pin my last year at college. I hadn’t seen him again until
last Christmas. I ran into him on Biscayne Boulevard. Then–just now–this wire–inviting me on a cruise of the Caribbean! The problem is clothes. I tore into my trunk to see what I have that’s suitable for the tropics!
STANLEY:
And come up with that–gorgeous–diamond–tiara?
BLANCHE:
This old relic? Ha-ha! It’s only rhinestones.
STANLEY:
Gosh. I thought it was Tiffany diamonds.
[He unbuttons his shirt.]
BLANCHE:
Well, anyhow, I shall be entertained in style.
STANLEY:
Uh-huh. It goes to show, you never know what is coming.
BLANCHE:
Just when I thought my luck had begun to fail me–
STANLEY:
Into the picture pops this Miami millionaire.
BLANCHE:
This man is not from Miami. This man is from Dallas.
STANLEY:
This man is from Dallas?
BLANCHE:
Yes, this man is from Dallas where gold spouts out of the ground!
STANLEY:
Well, just so he’s from somewhere!
[He starts removing his shirt.]
BLANCHE:
Close the curtains before you undress any further.
STANLEY [amiably]:
This is all I’m going to undress right now.
[He rips the sack off a quart beer bottle]
Seen a bottle opener?
[She moves slowly toward the dresser, where she stands with her hands knotted together.]
I used to have a cousin who could open a beer bottle with his teeth.
[Pounding the bottle cap on the corner of table]
That was his only accomplishment, all he could do–he was just a human bottle-opener. And then one time, at a wedding party, he broke his front teeth off! After that he was so ashamed of himself he used t’ sneak out of the house when company came….
[The bottle cap pops off and a geyser of foam shoots up. Stanley laughs happily, holding up the bottle over his head.]
Ha-ha! Rain from heaven!
[He extends the bottle toward her]
Shall we bury the hatchet and make it a loving-cup? Huh?
BLANCHE:
No, thank you.
STANLEY:
Well, it’s a red letter night for us both. You having an oil millionaire and me having a baby.
[He goes to the bureau in the bedroom and crouches to remove something from the bottom drawer.]
BLANCHE [drawing back]:
What are you doing in here?
STANLEY:
Here’s something I always break out on special occasions like this. The silk pyjamas I wore on my wedding night!
BLANCHE:
Oh.
STANLEY:
When the telephone rings and they say, “You’ve got a son!” Ill tear this off and wave it like a flag!
[He shakes out a brilliant pyjama coat]
I guess we are both entitled to put on the dog.
[He goes back to the kitchen with the coat over his arm.]
BLANCHE:
When I think of how divine it is going to be to have such a thing as privacy once more–I could weep with joy!
STANLEY:
This millionaire from Dallas is not going to interfere with your privacy any?
BLANCHE:
It won’t be the sort of thing you have in mind. This man is a gentleman and he respects me.
[Improvising feverishly]
What he wants is my companionship. Having great wealth sometimes makes people lonely! A cultivated woman, a woman of intelligence and breeding, can enrich a man’s life–immeasurably! I have those things to offer, and this doesn’t take them away. Physical beauty is passing. A
transitory possession. But beauty of the mind and richness of the spirit and tenderness of the heart–and I have all of those things–aren’t taken away, but grow! Increase with the years! How strange that I should be called a destitute woman! When I have all of these treasures locked in
my heart.
[A choked sob comes from her]
I think of myself as a very, very rich woman! But I have been foolish–casting my pearls before swine!
STANLEY:
Swine, huh?
BLANCHE:
Yes, swine! Swine! And I’m thinking not only of you but of your friend, Mr. Mitchell. He came to see me tonight. He dared to come here in his work-clothes! And to repeat slander to me, vicious stories that he had gotten from you! I gave him his walking papers….
STANLEY:
You did, huh?
BLANCHE:
But then he came back. He returned with a box of roses to beg my forgiveness! He implored my forgiveness. But some things are not forgivable. Deliberate cruelty is not forgivable. It is the one
unforgivable thing in my opinion and it is the one thing of which I have never, never been guilty. And so I told him, I said to him, “Thank you,” but it was foolish of me to think that we could ever adapt ourselves to each other. Our ways of life are too different. Our attitudes and our
backgrounds are incompatible. We have to be realistic about such things. So farewell, my friend! And let there be no hard feelings….
STANLEY:
Was this before or after the telegram came from the Texas oil millionaire?
BLANCHE:
What telegram! No! No, after! As a matter of fact, the wire came just as–
STANLEY:
As a matter of fact there wasn’t no wire at all!
BLANCHE:
Oh, oh!
STANLEY:
There isn’t no millionaire! And Mitch didn’t come back; with roses ’cause I know where he is–
BLANCHE:
Oh!
STANLEY:
There isn’t a goddam thing but imagination!
BLANCHE:
Oh!
STANLEY:
And lies and conceit and tricks!
BLANCHE:
Oh!
STANLEY:
And look at yourself! Take a look at yourself in that wornout Mardi Gras outfit, rented for fifty cents from some ragpicker! And with the crazy crown on! What queen do you think you are?
BLANCHE:
Oh–God…
STANLEY:
I’ve been on to you from the start! Not once did you pull any wool over this boy’s eyes! You come in here and sprinkle the place with powder and spray perfume and cover the light bulb with a paper lantern, and lo and behold the place has turned into Egypt and you are the Queen of the
Nile! Sitting on your throne and swilling down my liquor! I say–Ha!–Ha! Do you hear me? Ha–ha–ha!
[He walks into the bedroom.]
BLANCHE:
Don’t come in here!
[Lurid reflections appear on the wall around Blanche. The shadows are of a grotesque and menacing form. She catches her breath, crosses to the phone and jiggles the hook. Stanley goes into the bathroom and closes the door.]
Operator, operator! Give me long-distance, please…. I want to get in touch with Mr. Shep Huntleigh of Dallas. He’s so well-known he doesn’t require any address. Just ask anybody who–Wait! I–No, I couldn’t find it right now…. Please understand, I–No! No, wait! … One moment!
Someone is–Nothing! Hold on, please!
[She sets the phone down and crosses warily into the kitchen. The night is filled with inhuman voices like cries in a jungle.
[The shadows and lurid reflections move sinously as flames along the wall spaces.
[Through the back wall of the rooms, which have become transparent, can be seen the sidewalk. A prostitute has rolled a drunkard. He pursues her along the walk, overtakes her and there is a struggle. A policeman’s whistle breaks it up. The figures disappear.
[Some moments later the Negro Woman appears around the corner with a sequined bag which the prostitute had dropped on the walk. She is rooting excitedly through it.]
[Blanche presses her knuckles to her lips and returns slowly to the phone. She speaks in a hoarse whisper.]
BLANCHE:
Operator! Operator! Never mind long-distance. Get Western Union. There isn’t time to be–Western–Western Union!
[She waits anxiously.]
Western Union? Yes! I–want to–Take down this message! “In desperate, desperate circumstances! Help me! Caught in a trap. Caught in–” Oh!
[The bathroom door is thrown open and Stanley comes out in the brilliant silk pyjamas. He grins at her as he knots the tasseled sash about his waist. She gasps and backs away from the phone. He stares at her for a count of ten. Then a clicking becomes audible from the telephone, steady and rasping.]
STANLEY:
You left th’ phone off th’ hook.
[He crosses to it deliberately and sets it back on the hook. After he has replaced it, he stares at her again, his mouth slowly curving into a grin, as he weaves between Blanche and the outer door.
[The barely audible “blue piano” begins to drum up louder. The sound of it turns into the roar of an approaching locomotive. Blanche crouches, pressing her fists to her ears until it has gone by.]
BLANCHE [finally straightening]:
Let me–let me get by you!
STANLEY:
Get by me! Sure. Go ahead.
[He moves back a pace in the doorway.]
BLANCHE:
You–you stand over there!
[She indicates a further position.]
STANLEY [grinning]:
You got plenty of room to walk by me now.
BLANCHE:
Not with you there! But I’ve got to get out somehow!
STANLEY:
You think I’ll interfere with you? Ha-ha!
[The “blue piano” goes softly. She turns confusedly and makes a faint gesture. The inhuman jungle voices rise up. He takes a step toward her, biting his tongue which protrudes between his lips.]
STANLEY [softly]:
Come to think of it–maybe you wouldn’t be bad to–interfere with….
[Blanche moves backward through the door into the bedroom.]
BLANCHE:
Stay back! Don’t you come toward me another step or I’ll–
STANLEY:
What?
BLANCHE:
Some awful thing will happen! It will!
STANLEY:
What are you putting on now?
[They are now both inside the bedroom.]
BLANCHE:
I warn you, don’t, I’m in danger!
[He takes another step. She smashes a bottle on the table and faces him, clutching the broken top.]
STANLEY:
What did you do that for?
BLANCHE:
So I could twist the broken end in your face!
STANLEY:
I bet you would do that!
BLANCHE:
I would! I will if you–
STANLEY:
Oh! So you want some rough-house! All right, let’s have some rough-house!
[He springs toward her, overturning the table. She cries out and strikes at him with the bottle top but he catches her wrist.]
Tiger–tiger! Drop the bottle top! Drop it! We’ve had this date with each other from the beginning!
[She moans. The bottle top falls. She sinks to her knees. He picks up her inert figure and carries her to the bed. The hot trumpet and drums from the Four Deuces sound loudly.]

SCENE ELEVEN

It is some weeks later. Stella is packing Blanche’s things. Sounds of water can be heard running in the bathroom. The portieres are partly open on the poker players–Stanley, Steve, Mitch and Pablo–who sit around the table in the kitchen. The atmosphere of the kitchen is now the same
raw, lurid one of the disastrous poker night. The building is framed by the sky of turquoise. Stella has been crying as she arranges the flowery dresses in the open trunk. Eunice comes down the steps from her flat above and enters the kitchen. There is an outburst from the poker table.

STANLEY:
Drew to an inside straight and made it, by God.
PABLO:
Maldita sea to suerte!
STANLEY:
Put it in English, greaseball!
PABLO:
I am cursing your rutting luck.
STANLEY [prodigiously elated]:
You know what luck is? Luck is believing you’re lucky. Take at Salerno. I believed I was lucky. I figured that 4 out of 5 would not come through but I would… and I did. I put that down as a rule. To hold front position in this rat-race you’ve got to believe you are lucky.
MITCH:
You… you… you… Brag… brag… bull… bull.
[Stella goes into the bedroom and starts folding a dress.]
STANLEY:
What’s the matter with him?
EUNICE [walking past the table]:
I always did say that men are callous things with no feelings, but this does beat anything. Making pigs of yourselves.
[She comes through the portieres into the bedroom.]
STANLEY:
What’s the matter with her?
STELLA:
How is my baby?
EUNICE:
Sleeping like a little angel. Brought you some grapes.
[She puts them on a stool and lowers her voice.] Blanche?
STELLA:
Bathing.
EUNICE:
How is she?
STELLA:
She wouldn’t eat anything but asked for a drink.
EUNICE:
What did you tell her?
STELLA:
I–just told her that–we’d made arrangements for her to rest in the country. She’s got it mixed in her mind with Shep Huntleigh.
[Blanche opens the bathroom door slightly.]
BLANCHE:
Stella.
STELLA:
Yes, Blanche?
BLANCHE:
If anyone calls while I’m bathing take the number and tell them I’ll call right back.
STELLA:
Yes.
BLANCHE:
That cool yellow silk–the boucle. See if it’s crushed. If it’s not too crushed I’ll wear it and on the lapel that silver and turquoise pin in the shape of a seahorse. You will find them in the heart shaped box I keep my accessories in. And Stella… Try and locate a bunch of artificial violets in
that box, too, to pin with the seahorse on the lapel of the jacket.
[She closes the door. Stella turns to Eunice.]
STELLA:
I don’t know if I did the right thing.
EUNICE:
What else could you do?
STELLA:
I couldn’t believe her story and go on living with Stanley.
EUNICE:
Don’t ever believe it. Life has got to go on. No matter what happens, you’ve got to keep on going.
[The bathroom door opens a little.]
BLANCHE [looking out]:
Is the coast clear?
STELLA:
Yes, Blanche.
[To Eunice]
Tell her how well she’s looking.
BLANCHE:
Please close the curtains before I come out.
STELLA:
They’re closed.
STANLEY:
–How many for you?
PABLO:
–Two.
STEVE:
–Three.
[Blanche appears in the amber tight of the door. She has a tragic radiance in her red satin robe following the sculptural lines of her body. The “Varsouviana” rises audibly as Blanche enters the bedroom.]
BLANCHE [with faintly hysterical vivacity]:
I have just washed my hair.
STELLA:
Did you?
BLANCHE:
I’m not sure I got the soap out.
EUNICE:
Such fine hair!
BLANCHE [accepting the compliment]:
It’s a problem. Didn’t I get a call?
STELLA:
Who from, Blanche?
BLANCHE:
Shep Huntleigh….
STELLA:
Why, not yet, honey!
BLANCHE:
How strange! I–
[At the sound of Blanche’s voice Mitch’s arm supporting his cards has sagged and his gaze is dissolved into space. Stanley slaps him on the shoulder.]
STANLEY:
Hey, Mitch, come to!
[The sound of this new voice shocks Blanche. She makes a shocked gesture, forming his name with her lips. Stella nods and looks quickly away. Blanche stands quite still for some moments–the silver-backed mirror in her hand and a look of sorrowful perplexity as though all human
experience shows on her face. Blanche finally speaks but with sudden hysteria.]
BLANCHE:
What’s going on here?
[She turns from Stella to Eunice and back to Stella. Her rising voice penetrates the concentration of the game. Mitch ducks his head lower but Stanley shoves back his chair as if about to rise. Steve places a restraining hand on his arm.]
BLANCHE [continuing]:
What’s happened here? I want an explanation of what’s happened here.
STELLA [agonizingly]:
Hush! Hush!
EUNICE:
Hush! Hush! Honey.
STELLA:
Please, Blanche.
BLANCHE:
Why are you looking at me like that? Is something wrong with me?
EUNICE:
You look wonderful, Blanche. Don’t she look wonderful?
STELLA:
Yes.
EUNICE:
I understand you are going on a trip.
STELLA:
Yes, Blanche is. She’s going on a vacation.
EUNICE:
I’m green with envy.
BLANCHE:
Help me, help me get dressed!
STELLA [handing her dress]:
Is this what you–
BLANCHE:
Yes, it will do! I’m anxious to get out of here–this place is a trap!
EUNICE:
What a pretty blue jacket.
STELLA:
It’s lilac colored.
BLANCHE:
You’re both mistaken. It’s Delia Robbia blue. The blue of the robe in the old Madonna pictures. Are these grapes washed?
[She fingers the bunch of grapes which Eunice had brought in.]
EUNICE:
Huh?
BLANCHE:
Washed, I said. Are they washed?
EUNICE:
They’re from the French Market.
BLANCHE:
That doesn’t mean they’ve been washed.
[The cathedral bells chime]
Those cathedral bells–they’re the only clean thing in the Quarter. Well, I’m going now. I’m ready to go.
EUNICE [whispering]:
She’s going to walk out before they get here.
STELLA:
Wait, Blanche.
BLANCHE:
I don’t want to pass in front of those men.
EUNICE:
Then wait’ll the game breaks up.
STELLA:
Sit down and…
[Blanche turns weakly, hesitantly about. She lets them push her into a chair.]
BLANCHE:
I can smell the sea air. The rest of my time I’m going to spend on the sea. And when I die, I’m going to die on the sea. You know what I shall die of?
[She plucks a grape]
I shall die of eating an unwashed grape one day out on the ocean. I will die–with my hand in the hand of some nice-looking ship’s doctor, a very young one with a small blond mustache and a big silver watch. “Poor lady,” they’ll say, “the quinine did her no good. That unwashed grape has
transported her soul to heaven.”
[The cathedral chimes are heard]
And I’ll be buried at sea sewn up in a clean white sack and dropped overboard–at noon–in the blaze of summer–and into an ocean as blue as
[Chimes again]
my first lover’s eyes!
[A Doctor and a Matron have appeared around the corner of the building and climbed the steps to the porch. The gravity of their profession is exaggerated–the unmistakable aura of the state institution with its cynical detachment. The Doctor rings the doorbell. The murmur of the game is interrupted.]
EUNICE [whispering to Stella]:
That must be them.
[Stella presses her fists to her lips.]
BLANCHE [rising slowly]:
What is it?
EUNICE [affectedly casual]:
Excuse me while I see who’s at the door.
STELLA:
Yes.
[Eunice goes into the kitchen.]
BLANCHE [tensely]:
I wonder if it’s for me.
[A whispered colloquy takes place at the door.]
EUNICE [returning, brightly]:
Someone is calling for Blanche.
BLANCHE:
It is for me, then!
[She looks fearfully from one to the other and then to the portieres. The “Varsouviana” faintly plays]
Is it the gentleman I was expecting from Dallas?
EUNICE:
I think it is, Blanche.
BLANCHE:
I’m not quite ready.
STELLA:
Ask him to wait outside.
BLANCHE:
I…
[Eunice goes back to the portieres. Drums sound very softly.]
STELLA:
Everything packed?
BLANCHE:
My silver toilet articles are still out.
STELLA:
Ah!
EUNICE [returning]:
They’re waiting in front of the house.
BLANCHE:
They! Who’s “they”?
[The “Varsouviana” is playing distantly.
[Stella stares back at Blanche. Eunice is holding Stella’s arm. There is a moment of silence–no sound but that of Stanley steadily shuffling the cards.]
[Blanche catches her breath again and slips back into the flat with a peculiar smile, her eyes wide and brilliant. As soon as her sister goes past her, Stella closes her eyes and clenches her hands. Eunice throws her arms comforting about her. Then she starts up to her flat. Blanche stops just inside the door. Mitch keeps staring down at his hands on the table, but the other men look at her curiously. At last she starts around the table toward the bedroom. As she does, Stanley suddenly pushes back his chair and rises as if to block her way. The Matron follows her into the flat.]
STANLEY:
Did you forget something?
BLANCHE [shrilly]:
Yes! Yes, I forgot something!
[She rushes past him into the bedroom. Lurid reflections appear on the walls in odd, sinuous shapes. The “Varsouviana” is filtered into a weird distortion, accompanied by the cries and noises of the jungle. Blanche seizes the back of a chair as if to defend herself.]
STANLEY [sotto voice]:
Doc, you better go in.
DOCTOR [sotto voce, motioning to the Matron]:
Nurse, bring her out
[The Matron advances on one side, Stanley on the other, Divested of all the softer properties of womanhood, the Matron is a peculiarly sinister figure in her severe dress. Her voice is bold and toneless as a firebell.]
MATRON:
Hello, Blanche.
[The greeting is echoed and re-echoed by other mysterious voices behind the walls, as if reverberated through a canyon of rock.]
STANLEY:
She says that she forgot something.
[The echo sounds in threatening whispers.]
MATRON:
That’s all right.
STANLEY:
What did you forget, Blanche?
BLANCHE:
I–I–
MATRON:
It don’t matter. We can pick it up later.
STANLEY:
Sure. We can send it along with the trunk.
BLANCHE [retreating in panic]:
I don’t know you–I don’t know you. I want to be–left alone–please!
MATRON:
Now, Blanche!
ECHOES [rising and falling]:
Now, Blanche–now, Blanche–now, Blanche!
STANLEY:
You left nothing here but spilt talcum and old empty perfume bottles–unless it’s the paper lantern you want to take with you. You want the lantern?
[He crosses to dressing table and seizes the paper lantern, tearing it off the light bulb, and extends it toward her. She cries out as if the lantern was herself. The Matron steps boldly toward her. She screams and tries to break past the Matron. All the men spring to their feet. Stella runs
out to the porch, with Eunice following to comfort her, simultaneously with the confused voices of the men in the kitchen. Stella rushes into Eunice’s embrace on the porch.]
STELLA:
Oh, my God, Eunice help me! Don’t let them do that to her, don’t let them hurt her! Oh, God, oh, please God, don’t hurt her! What are they doing to her? What are they doing?
[She tries to break from Eunice’s arms.]
EUNICE:
No, honey, no, no, honey. Stay here. Don’t go back in there. Stay with me and don’t look.
STELLA:
What have I done to my sister? Oh, God, what have I done to my sister?
EUNICE:
You done the right thing, the only thing you could do. She couldn’t stay here; there wasn’t no other place for her to go.
[While Stella and Eunice are speaking on the porch the voices of the men in the kitchen overlap them. Mitch has started toward the bedroom. Stanley crosses to block him. Stanley pushes him aside. Mitch lunges and strikes at Stanley. Stanley pushes Mitch back. Mitch collapses at the
table, sobbing.
[During the preceding scenes, the Matron catches hold of Blanche’s arm and prevents her flight. Blanche turns wildly and scratches at the Matron. The heavy woman pinions her arms. Blanche cries out hoarsely and slips to her knees.]
MATRON:
These fingernails have to be trimmed.
[The Doctor comes into the room and she looks at him.]
Jacket, Doctor?
DOCTOR:
Not unless necessary.
[He takes off his hat and now he becomes personalized. The unhuman quality goes. His voice is gentle and reassuring as he crosses to Blanche and crouches in front of her. As he speaks her name, her terror subsides a little. The lurid reflections fade from the walls, the inhuman cries and
noises die out and her own hoarse crying is calmed.]
DOCTOR:
Miss DuBois.
[She turns her face to him and stares at him with desperate pleading. He smiles; then he speaks to the Matron.]
It won’t be necessary.
BLANCHE [faintly]:
Ask her to let go of me.
DOCTOR [to the Matron]:
Let go.
[The Matron releases her. Blanche extends her hands toward the Doctor. He draws her up gently and supports her with his arm and leads her through the portieres.]
BLANCHE [holding tight to his arm]:
Whoever you are–I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.
[The poker players stand back as Blanche and the Doctor cross the kitchen to the front door. She allows him to lead her as if she were blind. As they go out on the porch, Stella cries out her sister’s name from where she is crouched a few steps up on the stairs.]
[Blanche walks on without turning, followed by the Doctor and the Matron. They go around the corner of the building.]
[Eunice descends to Stella and places the child in her arms. It is wrapped in a pale blue blanket. Stella accepts the child, sobbingly. Eunice continues downstairs and enters the kitchen where the men, except for Stanley, are returning silently to their places about the table. Stanley has gone out on the porch and stands at the foot of the steps looking at Stella.]
STANLEY [a bit uncertainly]:
Stella?
[She sobs with inhuman abandon. There is something luxurious in her complete surrender to crying now that her sister is gone.]
STANLEY [voluptuously, soothingly]:
Now, honey. Now, love. Now, now, love.
[He kneels beside her and his fingers find the opening of her blouse] Now, now, love. Now,love….
[The luxurious sobbing, the sensual murmur fade away under the swelling music of the “blue piano” and the muted trumpet.]
STEVE:
This game is seven-card stud.

The End

2021-2030

%d bloggers like this: